Localisation vs. Globalisation

An interesting article (could be behind a paywall) from Gillian Tett in the FT on how executives had already been turning away from globalisation, well before Donald Trump arrived at the White House. It is not too hard to fathom the reasons: they went for cost savings. They had dried up. So, they return. Technology has also made local manufacturing competitive, perhaps. I do not know. I am guessing. More interesting for me was the question of what it meant for the balance between capital and labour.

Globalisation – whether jobs went or work went overseas – expanded the global supply of labour. That, in part, contributed to the withering of labour bargaining power in the West and kept a lid on wage growth. This was true from the Eighties and more so in the new millennium, after the entry of China into the WTO in 2001.

Now, the big question is if the ‘reversal’ of the trend would restore the balance between capital and labour. If one may hazard a guess, it does not seem like it because this reversal is being driven by the same profit consideration too that drove globalisation.

Nothing wrong about the motivation at all except that the fruits of such business decisions were shared in blatantly lopsided fashion. Now, technology – robotics and AI – might end up postponing (or, denying) the reversal of the capital vs. labour imbalance that began in the 1980s.

One thought that the global crisis of 2008 would force a re-examination of many undesirable trends that had taken roots in the previous quarter century: leveraging, financialisation, executive compensation and the erosion of social compacts of business. That has not happened yet. One hopes (in vain) read some good news from Gillian Tett on these.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s